Tag Archives: Salary

4 qualifications job candidates must demonstrate during the interview

It’s no secret that job seekers must satisfy three requirements to land a job:

  1. They can do the job.
  2. They will do the job.
  3. They will fit in.

motivated-girl

These three requirements are the foundation of a complete candidate.

There’s also a fourth piece to the puzzle. It is often overlooked, but some companies place more importance on it than any of the other requirements. This fourth requirement is the cause of much consternation for many a job seeker. Can you guess what it is?

Let’s take a look at these three requirements every candidate must satisfy – and the mysterious fourth one as well:

1. Can You Do the Job?

Of course interviewers won’t ask the question so directly. Rather, they’ll pose more indirect questions, like:

“What skills and experience do you see being necessary to do the job?”

“Tell me about a time when you handled problem X.”

“What kind of experience do you have in the area of Y?”

And you should always be prepared to answer the “Tell me about yourself” question.

For many employers, this is the most important requirement for any potential employee to meet – but the following three cannot be overlooked.

2. Will You Do the job?

Employers want to know how motivated you are. They’ll want to know if you’ll enjoy the responsibilities and support the mission of the organization. Will you work until the job is finished?

You may have to field a question like, “Why do you want to work for this company?” Think about it: Would you, as an employer, want to hire someone who isn’t totally into working for your company? Probably not.

Or, “Tell us which responsibilities of the job you will enjoy taking on. And why?”

“Tell us about a time when you took on a challenge you thought was insurmountable.”

How can you prove your desire to take on the responsibilities of the position or work for the company? Stories using the situation-task-action-result (STAR) formula are a great way to demonstrate your motivation and passion for the job.

3. Will You Fit?

Showing that you’ll be a good fit is tough to do, but it’s a concern many employers have. It’s all about your personality. They don’t want to hire someone who won’t get along with coworkers.

In this area, you’re likely to face behavioral questions, such as, “Tell me about a time when you had to deal with an irate colleague.”

Or, “What’s your definition of a team, and how have you been a team player in the past?”

To some employers, your cultural fit will be even more important than your technical skills. Technical skills can be learned, but it can be difficult – if not impossible – to learn new personality traits.

Can you train someone to become more sensitive? What about teaching a talkative person to become a listener? Can you improve the attitude of someone who has difficulty interacting with other departments? The answer to all these questions is probably “no.”

4. The Final Requirement: Are You Affordable?

dollar-signAs stated above, some employers stress this requirement even more than the others – especially when landing a candidate who costs less is a priority. Sure, a candidate who meets the other three requirements would be ideal, but not always necessary.

During an interview, the first question out of the recruiter’s mouth might be related to salary: “What do you expect for salary?” or “What did you make at your last company?” These salary questions could come during the phone or in-person interview, so make sure you’re prepared to answer in a way that doesn’t cause you to lose out on the salary you deserve.

Don’t be surprised if you’re out of this employer’s price range – it can happen.

Salary negotiation makes some people’s skin crawl because they see it as a confrontation. In fact, it’s a straightforward affair. Companies don’t want to pay you too little because it can lead to resentment. However, this is business, so employers aren’t going to give away the farm, either.


Being able to address the three most obvious concerns employers have is what gets you to the fourth concern – can they afford you? If you do a great job meeting the first three requirements, the last one should go smoothly – as long as you’re reasonable.

This article appeared in Recruiter.com.

 

7 steps to successful salary negotiations

The interview went extremely well. So well, in fact, that the hiring manager has offered you the position and then says, “What I need to know now is what is your salary requirement?”

negotiating-salary

Wow, you think. You were fairly sure you’d be offered the job, and that’s a good thing. However, you aren’t ready to have the salary conversation just yet. But the interviewer is looking at you with expectation. Surely you have a salary in mind.

All too often, people freeze when asked about salary expectations, or they quickly throw out a figure. This can lead to candidates asking for too much and pricing themselves out of consideration or asking for too little and settling for an unsatisfactory salarie.

If you want to ensure you get a fair salary and benefits package, follow these steps:

1. Start off on the right note

You probably think your résumé is the first contact you have with an employer, and that is usually the case. You submit a strong résumé that shows the value you’ll bring to the employer. It is loaded with relevant accomplish statements and tailored to that particular job.

But here’s a better first-contact scenario: You find a contact within the company who can lead you to a decision-maker. You and the decision-maker have a few very productive conversations during which you’re able to sell yourself face to face. Eventually, a position becomes available. By then, you are already considered a shoo-in for the role.

2. Do your homework

First, you must determine the salary you’re able to live on. Next, you determine what you’d consider your “dream salary.” For example, maybe you can live on $80,000, but you’d be ecstatic with $90,000.

It is important to be realistic about your value in the labor market. There are tools out there that can help you with this, such as Salary.com.

The second piece of your homework requires determining the employer’s budget, or what it can pay. Networking with people within the company will play a huge part in understanding what the employer can pay. However, if you can’t do this, Glassdoor can be of some assistance.

3. Sell yourself during the interview

So you’ve set the stage by networking and having a series of meetings with the hiring decision-maker, or you’ve submitted a strong, tailored resume. Congratulations – you landed an interview! It doesn’t end here, though.

You will continue to sell your value throughout the interview process. Your job of selling yourself will be easier if you understand the employer’s pain points. Are there lagging sales? Inefficient processes? Poor communication within departments? Enormous waste? Hint: during the first stage of the process, you should ask the right questions to determine their pain point.

Loaded with this information, address these pain points whenever you can during the interview, thereby showing you understand the needs of the employer and that you can meet them.

 4. Ask for the employer’s range

Now that you’ve determined your needs and the employer’s budget, you are at a stronger vantage point for the salary negotiation. But before you engage in a negotiation, it’s important to realize two things: one, employers expect you to negotiate; and two, you are the one they want – and for this reason, you have more leverage.

The first step in responding to the employer’s query regarding your salary expectations is to ask for the employer’s range. Employers will generally disclose their ranges, but keep in mind that the numbers they offer are usually within their first or second quartiles.

For example, if the employer provides a range of $80,000 to $90,000, chances are the real range is $80,000 to $100,000. Based on your research of the company, the employer’s range should be approximately the range you expected.

Your next step is to offer a range of your own. Your range should exceed the range given by the employer. You might give $92,500 to $94,500, for example. The lower figure would be your anchor. An anchor is a number that focuses the other negotiator’s attention and expectations, so make sure it’s a salary you’d be happy with.

Note: Some active job seekers might feel uncomfortable going beyond the employer’s high end, for fear of not getting the job. I still advise stating a range beginning within their range and ending beyond their highest figure. An example might be $88,000 to $92,000.

5. Back up your expectations

You aren’t justified in asking for a salary higher than the employer’s offer unless you back your request up with facts and figures. Focus on the pain points and illustrate how you can alleviate them.

You may reply with, “First, I’d like to tell you that this job interests me very much. I will be committed to it and the company, if we can be closer to the $92,500 to $94,500 range. I know your sales department needs someone to infuse motivation into it. I want to remind you that I was able to increase sales by at least 85 percent at my last three companies. Further, I will bring in four times the salary you’re offering. I’ve also contributed to my previous positions by presenting at the AA-ISP’s Inside Sales conference. I can bring more visibility to the company. Are we on the same page?”

6. Remember the Benefits Package

You may come to a standstill during salary negotiations. When this happens, the best recourse is to divert to benefits. Many people don’t realize that benefits, such as vacation, flex time, and stock options, can be negotiated. Remember, it’s not all about salary.

For example, “I understand there are budget constraints, so I’d like to talk about vacation time. Where I last worked, I accumulated five weeks of vacation. You’re offering two weeks. If we could agree on four and a half weeks of vacation, I’d be happy accepting your offer.”

7. Ask for time to consider the offer

Congratulations, you negotiated the salary you wanted, but they weren’t as generous with the vacation you wanted. Tell the employer you’re happy that you’ve come to a satisfactory figure, but would like some time to think or talk with your spouse about the whole package. Assure them that you’ll call them within 24 hours.

Perhaps the employer wouldn’t budge on the salary but can offer you the additional two and a half weeks of vacation you asked for. Again, ask for time to think about the whole package.

This is normal procedure with most job offers. Employers want you to be certain that you’ll take the job. But there are two reasons why you ask for time. First, this is a huge step; you want to make sure you’re making the right decision. Second, this will give the employer time to reconsider (it worked for me).

When you call the employer take the time to ask them how they came to their decision and ask if you can revisit the salary or benefits. Hopefully they’ll be amenable to your request, but if not, give them your answer.


Negotiating salary can be stressful. It’s important that you view it as a business transaction, not a confrontation. Always keep a level head and try to smile during the process. And if one company can’t meet you where you want to be, remember that there will be other offers from employers who will be able to accommodate your needs.

Photo, Flickr, bm_adverts

7 reasons to say no to a job offer

NOI don’t recommend that my customers say no to a job offer unless there’s a good reason. That’s why when one of my most promising customers told me she was reluctant to accept a job offer at a leading hotel corporation, I advised her to consider the circumstances.

First of all, she would be assuming a great deal of responsibilities. And second she’d be making 70% of what she previously made. Both of these factoids seemed the equivalent of doing hard labor in a rock quarry and being paid minimum wage.

I only needed to point out the disparity of salaries for her to decline the offer, even though she had negotiated a $4,000 increase. (Actually she’s smart enough to realize this.) You must be practical when considering the salary for the position. Can you pay essential bills with the salary? Will you have to cut back too much on “wants?”

There are times when you should decline an offer. My customer’s story is just one of them. A ridiculous salary offer isn’t the only reason for declining an offer. There are six others.

You’re not excited. When pundits say you’re not the only person being interviewed, they’re correct. The responsibilities of said position have to motivate you to be your best. They have to excite you.

So it figures that not only should the employer be concerned about your motivation; you should want to be motivated as well. Will the position challenge you to do your best and offer variety, or will it be a dead-end street?

Bad work environment. Another reason for not accepting an offer is sensing a volatile work environment. A former colleague of mine would often confide in me that where she was working was a toxic work environment. Management was distrustful of its employees and would often be abusive.

During an interview you should ask questions that would uncover the company’s environment. A simple one is, “Why did the former marketing specialist leave?” Or, “What makes your employees happy working here?” What about, “How do you reward your employees for creativity and innovation?”

Sincere answers to these questions will assure you that you are entering an environment with your eyes wide open, good or bad. Vague responses should raise a red flag. The best way to determine what kind of environment you may inherit is to network with people who work at a potential organization.

It goes against your morals and values. Salary.com gives this reason. “The nature of your temporary work shouldn’t make you feel like you’re compromising who you are or your beliefs. Obviously you should avoid anything illegal, but beyond that black and white is a lot of grey.”

Some of my customers have learned this lesson too late. They took a job they were not sure of and had to resign because of lack of integrity. “I should have known the company was wrong when they put off my questions about integrity,” one of them said to me.

Security. A fifth reason for not accepting an offer is the financial status of the company. If you discover through discussions that the company is at risk of closing its doors soon, it’s not wise to accept the offer, even if you “just want a job.”

This also goes for grant-funded positions. A position that will end in less than a year should make you consider if you want to join the organization only to be let go before you even get your feet wet.

You lack goals. Some of my customers have told me that they’ve been taking temp-to-perm positions that have spanned over many years; and that they’re tired of the short-term stints. Additionally, their résumé resembles one that shouts, “Job hopper.”

Your current unemployment can be a time to strategize about where you want your career to go, a time to experience clarity, not throwing darts at a wall of short-term jobs. Or if you’re unemployed, take time to think about what you really want in your next career. The offer you’ve just received should match your goals and career direction.

It’s not a cliche when I tell my customers that things happen for a reason. After I was laid off from marketing, I had a chance to reflect on what I really wanted to do. I had clear goals. So here I am.

Because you can. I say this knocking on wood. The labor market hasn’t been this healthy in years. With the “official” unemployment rate hovering around 5.0%, this is a great sign.

This also means your chances of getting a job are very good, so you can be selective…to a point. I’m not encouraging you to wait until your 25th week of UI to pull the trigger. You don’t want to cause undue stress by waiting too long to begin an earnest job search.

This may be a great time for you to get trained in skills you lack. In the state of Massachusetts, you can train (often free of charge) 20 hours a week, while still receiving your UI benefits. Are you a project manager but don’t have a Project Management Professional (PMP) cerfification? Now would be a good time to pass up a job you’re not so sure about.


While I wanted my customer to land a job in a short period of job seeking, I would have kicked myself for telling her that a bird in hand is better than nothing. I have tremendous faith in her abilities and tenacity and don’t want her to take a job that won’t make her happy. She will be land soon. That I’m sure of.

Photo: Flickr, Nathan Gibbs