2 differences between the Résumé and LinkedIn Profile–Part 1

resume linkedinI tell attendees of my Advanced LinkedIn workshop, “Your LinkedIn profile is not your résumé.” It’s important for me to say this, as some of their LinkedIn profiles resemble their résumé. I can spot a copy-and-paste a mile away.

A LinkedIn “résumé” gives off a generic look rather than a unique document that makes LinkedIn a powerful tool for the job search. Potential employers are not looking for a rehash of your résumé; they’re looking for more, another look.

Let’s examine two differences between the résumé and profile.

The most obvious difference between the résumé and LinkedIn profile is the Photo. Because LinkedIn is a networking application and the résumé is a job search document, here is one major difference. A photo on your LinkedIn profile is necessary, as it enhances your brand. It may tell visitor you’re creative, sincere and compassionate, a leader, ambitious, serious, etc.

As well, a profile with a photo is more trustworthy and memorable. A recent statistic states that a profile with a photo is seven times more likely to be opened.  I for one will not open a profile if it lacks a photo, unless it’s someone I know.

I tell my attendees that despite their fear of age discrimination, a photo is necessary to network. Imagine attending a networking event where people walk around with a paper bag on their head. Not very personal.

The headline is second on the list of differences between the résumé and LinkedIn profile. An Advanced résumé must have a branding headline that immediately tells potential employers that you are the right person for the job. The headline is a simple line or two of what you do and some of your areas of strength. Here’s an example of a position-specific branding title:

Marketing Specialist 

Public Relations ~ Vendor Relations ~ Staff Supervision ~ Web Design ~ Event Coordination

Look at another branding headline that is written for a similar job:

Marketing Coordinator

Social Media | Trade Shows | International Travel | Increased Production | Graphic Design

Your LinkedIn profile has a branding headline that is similar to your résumé’s headline, save for the fact the profile isn’t written for a specific job. It needs to include more general skills/keywords. You may choose to use a branding statement instead. The same position may resemble this:

Marketing Specialist with expertise in Public Relations, Trade Shows, Vendor Relations, Web Content,
Event Coordination;
leading to increased visibility and profitability for your company.

Furthermore, the branding headline adds to the keyword count for those whose résumé will be sent through an applicant tracking system (ATS). As well it makes being found on LinkedIn more possible with key skills of your occupation and industry/ies.

In the next post, we’ll look at the differences between the résumé’s Core Competencies and the LinkedIn Skills and Expertise sections.

 

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10 thoughts on “2 differences between the Résumé and LinkedIn Profile–Part 1

  1. Laura Smith-Proulx, Executive Resume Writer

    Bob,

    Perfect way to introduce the concept… “I can spot a copy-and-paste a mile away.” Resumes are written (still!) for paper or classic document viewing, but LinkedIn copy should be written for the WEB.

    We all click on websites so quickly, and LinkedIn is no exception. Writing the Profile to be succinct and express a job seeker’s value (quickly) is so critical. Great post!

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  2. Things Career Related Post author

    Thanks Laura. There are certain profiles we linger on and read more of the content than other profiles. These are the ones that capture our attention. Rehash of resumes don’t. I won’t commit to one over the other because they have different purposes.

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  3. Lisa Strickland

    Great series – practical tips everyone can use to enhance their personal brand. I run a nonprofit (Operation Boomerang) to help the long-term under/unemployed over age 45 find jobs. We’re helping job-seekers return to the workforce by sponsoring resume and LinkedIn profile makeovers. I’ll be reposting both articles on the OpBoom Facebook page (website in the works). This information is invaluable, especially for those who haven’t conducted a job search in many years, because it illustrates the importance of establishing a digital presence — a must for todays’ job seeker.

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    1. Things Career Related Post author

      Thanks, Lisa. And bless you for the work you do. Mature workers find it harder to find work than younger workers, but with a great resume and LinkedIn profile, they have a better chance of getting to the interview and selling their maturity. Also, a great profile shows employers they’re up on technology.

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  4. lstrickland01

    Great series – practical tips everyone can use to enhance their personal brand. I run a nonprofit (Operation Boomerang) that helps the long-term under/unemployed over age 45 find jobs. We’re helping job-seekers return to the workforce by sponsoring resume and LinkedIn profile makeovers. I’ll be reposting both articles on the Operation Boomerang Facebook page. This information is invaluable, especially for those who haven’t conducted a job search in many years, because it illustrates the importance of establishing a digital presence — a must for todays’ job seeker.

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    Reply
  5. Paul Lawrence

    This article should encourage those on LinkedIn to optimally market themselves. To do this takes forethought, time and effort and I agree with Bob that this is not a simple ‘cut and pasting’ of informaiton from previously used sources. Marketing yourself is an art but once learnt it will bring great rewards in your professional and personal lives.

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  6. Donna Lemire

    I found the Advanced LinkedIn workshop Bob teaches very helpful. I have not been in the job search arena for 20 years and now see the importance of NOT using your resume word for word when marketing yourself on LinkedIn. After this workshop I edited my profile and hope to use it as a tool to get myself out there and in front of potential employers. Thank you Bob!

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    1. Things Career Related Post author

      Thank you, Donna. I think one should start out by copying and pasting the content of his/her resume to the profile, but after doing that modify it to be a profile; not a resume on line. There is a difference. I’ll talk about the Summary statement next.

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  7. Pingback: The difference between the résumé’s and LinkedIn profile’s skills sections–Part 2 | Things Career Related

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