Tag Archives: Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

The introvert extra and extravert ham

One thing I hate about a party is a loudmouth who demands the attention of the whole room. That’s why when my wife said we were invited to a good friend’s party last week, my jaw clenched and I told her I’m not staying past 10:00 pm, and oh yeah, we’re traveling in two cars.

I really dig our friends and the majority of cast of characters who comprise the group, but there’s one woman who exhibits one trait of an extravert–the propensity to speak. Except, in her case she dominates a group with her incessant talking.

On the flip side is a male member of the group who is as quiet as a mouse, but when the time is right, he’ll tell a story that will make you laugh until it hurts. Like the story about going camping with a bunch of his buddies. How they had one match between them to light a fire and how they relied on their  Boy Scout experience to light that fire.

Other than a story like this, he rarely says much, preferring to stand among the men in the group and stare into the glow of the fire. I attempt to prompt him with talk of sports and our children, but there’s little in return.

After my friend and the rest of the fathers have it with warming our hands by the fire that night it’s time to go inside where the wives and children are gathered around the woman who is talking about nothing in particular and, it seems to me, literally sucking the air out of the room.

A reader commented on one of my blog posts saying that an extravert who exerts herself excessively can be a ham, whereas an introvert who stays in the background too much runs the risk of being an extra. I see the woman of whom I speak the ham and the man who delivers the hilarious story, albeit infrequently, the extra. I also ponder the question of how introverts and extraverts can better communicate with each other.

  1. First, each type needs to be cognizant of the need for the other to be heard.
  2. Second, active listening must be involved, not merely the appearance of listening.
  3. Lastly, each type must be willing to contribute to the conversation. As I think about the times my male companion and I stand by the fire in silence, I wonder if both of us are doing our part in building a conversation.

My good friend and champion of introverts, Pat Weber, adds about the need for extraverts to be considerate of introverts, “Often times as introverts we aren’t going to share much personal information in a conversation. Extroverts who are aware of this will fare better by giving us some space, with silence, to let us have a moment or so to think! Silent space is one of the most appreciated gifts of better communications with us. Then we can keep our end of things up.”

Introverts have an obligation to contribute to the conversation and not be content with listening to a one-way dialog. Although it may require more energy and adaptability, the introvert doesn’t have to sustain the effort forever. A lack of effort indicates to others aloofness and disinterest–it’s insulting. When all the words are distinguished like the fire in London’s short story, it’s perfectly fine to leave the party…in the second car.

Newsflash–a new test finally makes résumés obsolete

The new argument for the death of résumés (will it ever end?) is not LinkedIn or any other online profile that will cause its demise; no, it’s a personality test called Cream.hr, which guarantees to make the hiring process flawless.

It takes more pressure off hiring managers, recruiters, and human resources. What a wonderful thing; no more résumés and less decision making from hiring authorities.

An article in Wired.com  called Kill Your Résumé: What about Using Science to Hire asserts that this test “can unearth the perfect job candidates even if they don’t necessarily have the most relevant work experience or college degree on paper.” The test can even select executive-level candidates worth interviewing, assuring hiring authorities they have what it takes.

According to Cream.hr the most essential skills are “task management skills, work ethic, intelligence, and what it calls the “Big Five” personality traits – openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism.” And this test will nail down all these traits without a single résumé having to be read. Simply wonderful.

What makes this tests even more amazing is that it’s hard for applicants to fool it, as opposed to a personality test that many companies use, Unicru. The way Cream.hr accomplishes this is by asking similar questions multiple times to assure consistency in answers.

For example, one question gives you a list of five personalities traits including “I am the life of the party” and “I am always prepared,” both of which sound similar to the Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator. The first example determines extraversion, while the second speaks to a preference for judging.

(Maybe what’s really got me riled is the fact that extraversion is a preferred trait for candidates. After all, introverts can’t possibly be considered among the “perfect” candidates, can they? I think most of my introverted colleagues would disagree whole-heartily with this assumption.)

It’s possible that résumés will finally become obsolete, which means jobseekers will no longer have to labor over writing them and, most importantly, employers will no longer have to read them. This is a big selling point for the Cream.hr; for a mere fee ranging from $99.00 to $499.00, companies will no longer have to read tons of résumés.

I have some questions about the effectiveness of this wunder software, such as, does it identify a candidate’s accomplishments, or reveal one’s ability to write succinctly, or show the jobseeker’s understanding of the position? Will it make companies lazy as they rely on a test that has as much human element as…a robot.

The hiring process is never a sure thing but to use a test to determine that best candidates, no matter how accurate, is simply that…a test. If all companies rely on a test such as this, our job as career advisors will be to teach our clients to answer the questions the way employers want them to. We’ll see how this argument goes.