The 6 lessons to learn from the school of the job search…

Find a job

…before you even send out your résumé.

If there’s anyone who’s tired of hearing, “The job search is a full time job,” it’s me. This cliché is as worn out as my favorite pair of jeans. So I’m proposing a different saying: “The job search is like going to school.” Why? Because going to school implies learning something, whereas a full time job can mean a whole slew of things.

Remember school where your intellect was challenged, where you studied hard and debated harder, where you looked forward to your next round table lesson on Jung and King Lear? Or the challenging material you tackled in Embedded Computing in Engineering Design? It was good stuff.

The lessons of the job search are of a different nature but are important in their own regard. The following six lessons I propose you must learn before sending out your résumé.

Lesson One: It sucks losing your job. This is the first lesson you learn from the job search. And how well you handle this it will determine your success. Let me advise you to allow yourself a period of suffering, no less than three days, no more than two weeks*. It’s not clear if everyone goes through the five stages of grief in the same order, or if you’ll even experience all five stages of grief, which are.

  1. Denial and Isolation
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

For example, you may skip denial and isolation, bargaining, or depression. I would personally call depression a bit strong; I prefer despondency. My point being is that no two people handle the emotional aspect of the job loss the same.

Lesson Two: Know what you want to do before acting. Picture saying to your kids and wife/husband that the whole family is going on a trip, and they ask, “Where?” Your response is “I don’t know.” Your family members won’t have faith in your planning ability. This lesson is important because without knowing what you want to do–where you’re going on your trip–you’ll be spinning your wheels. You’ll lack direction and be totally ineffective.

So when jobseekers tell me they’re not sure what they want to do, I tell them until they know what they want to do, all the dandy advice they’ve been receiving is a waste of time. There are numerous career tests and personality assessments you can take that gauge your interests, skills, and values, but I’m a firm believer in also searching your soul for what you want to do.

Lesson Three: Let people know you’re looking for work. This seems like the most obvious lesson, but you’d be surprised how many people don’t let their friends, neighbors, convenience store owner, hair stylist, etc., know they’re out of work. How can these people help you if the don’t know.

I remember years ago when one of my customers came to my office just before Christmas. I asked him what his plans were and he told me his family was hosting the dinner. Great I replied. But what he said threw me for a loop. “It’s going to be weird. No one knows I’m out of work,” he replied. Family and friends can be your best allies.

Lesson Four: Futility 101. Anyone who thinks sending out 600 résumés will result in 300 interviews and 30 job offers probably also believes the sun revolves around the earth. Despite the many blog posts, books, and speakers who say using job boards as the primary method of looking for work is a waste of time; many jobseekers still do this.

Six hundred is not a number I drew out of a hat. I recall reading on LinkedIn about a person who was seeking career advice and was bewildered that she hadn’t received one interview. Yes, she had mailed out 600 résumés and waited for the phone to ring.

Lesson Five: Do your research. Remember when you were in school and had to do research to write papers? Now your research is even more important. So instead of “shotgunning” résumés, research the companies for which you’d like to work. Develop a list of 20 or so companies and determine where there’s growth by going to their websites. For companies showing growth, send approach letters asking to meet with someone at the company for an informational meeting.

Key points: Don’t ask for a job during the informational meetings. Instead ask illuminating questions that create a vibrant conversation, a conversation that will secure an important connection. Who knows, maybe there is a job developing at the company. You might be recommended to the hiring manager if you’re able to impress your new connection.

Lesson Six: Connect with others. Whether you want to attend networking events or prefer to focus on connecting in the community, make sure you’re identifying people who can be of assistance. LinkedIn’s Companies feature has proved to be a great tool for this, but simply making inquiries can work as well.

One of my customers came to me one day and said, “Bob, I found a job!” Great I told him. “Yeah, but I didn’t network,” he told me. “No, I handed my résumé to my neighbor; he handed it to the hiring manager in the department I wanted to work; I was called in for an interview; and I got the job. Connecting works in many ways.


Having completed all the lessons above, now it’s time to send your résumé to companies you’ve identified as the ones you’d like to work for. Next we’ll look at the remaining lessons of the job search.

My nomination for 2014 Person of the Year Runner-Up.

On December 10, 2014, Time announced its Person of the Year, The Ebola Fighter. I can think of no better Person of the Year. How can we argue against the brave people who fought against the most deadly disease I’ve witnessed in my lifetime–official death count is higher than 6,300 people.

jobseekers 2The disease that continues to ravage Africa invaded the rest of the world, requiring people worldwide to combat it. The Ebola Fighters were courageous as they risked death to help those in need. That said, I will not argue with Time’s choice. The Ebola Fighters truly deserve the nod. But as traditions go, I want to honor The Jobseeker as Person of the Year Runner-Up.

The Jobseeker. Although the Jobseeker is not the Ebola Fighter–he or she demonstrated dignity and professionalism, networked and paid it forward, wrote compelling marketing material resulting in interviews, and finally (after more than a year, in some cases), did their best to land. There were many Jobseekers who demonstrated true heroism throughout the entire year, simply by the way they handled themselves. They:

  • Woke up every morning to put in a full day of hunting for work, leaving no stones upturned and considering every possibility.
  • Maintained that screw-the-economy-I-will-get-a-job attitude.
  • Knew that every day was a day when they might have run into a person who could hire them, or someone who knew a person who could hire them.
  • Took a break every once and awhile to recharge their batteries, but not too long of a break. A day or two at the most. They even networked during the holidays.
  • Followed their career plan of revising their résumé, creating a list of companies they research and contacted, building a LinkedIn profile that meets today’s standards, and other best practices.
  • Attended workshops and took advantage of job-search pundits’ advice, learning that things have changed in the past ten years, but, nonetheless, trudge on.
  • Accepted and embraced the Hidden Job Market, making penetrating it a priority in their job-search plan.
  • Attended interview after interview until they hit a home run with an employer smart enough to hire them. The Jobseeker will never give up, despite the challenges they encounter.
  • Never forgot the important things in life, like family and friends, and taking care of their health. They didn’t let the job search consume them.
  • They stayed positive and upbeat in all their interactions, knowing that people can sense a positive attitude.
  • Faced despondency or depression with courage and perseverance.

These are just a few of the reasons why The Jobseeker  is my Person of the Year Runner-Up. If you think of other reasons, let me know by commenting on this article. I think I should send my reasons to Time and demand a recount.

Dear college students, 7 signs that you’re probably an introvert

college student studyingIt seems at times like you’re living your life looking from the outside in. When you’re asked to describe yourself, words like these come to mind: “quiet,” “contemplative,” “reflective,” “creative,” “thoughtful.”

You’ve never taken the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, so you’re not sure if you’re included in approximately 50% of of the U.S. population that are introverts. (Estimates range from 35%-51%.)

Are you an introvert? Chances are great if you relate to the following preferences:

1. You’d rather write a paper and communicate via email than communicate verbally. Your forte is writing papers because you have the time to research the topic and write down your thoughts. You have the ability to concentrate on the topic at hand, take time to formulate your sentences and paragraphs.

Group discussions can go either way for you; great because you’re hitting each point, or poorly because you prefer to think before speaking, unlike your counterpart, the extravert. If the class is being dominated by the extraverts, you may have a hard time speaking up. You have the correct answers but hesitate and miss your opportunities.

Note: Times like these will be a good lesson for when you enter the workforce where the extraverts can dominate the meetings, unless you find those small breaks in discussion to express your thoughts. No, don’t bother raising your hand.

2. You’d prefer to work alone or with one other classmate. While many people–mainly extraverts–think teamwork and brainstorming are the key to creativity, other wiser people know creativity can come from individual work. Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, asserts that creativity has little to do with group collaboration:

“There’s a lot of nonsense floating around these days about how creativity is fundamentally social act. Ignore this. Yes, creativity is social in the sense that we all stand on the shoulders of those who came before us….But for many people, the creative thinking process is a solo act,” she writes in a blog post.

Note: In the workplace a great deal of emphasis is placed on working as a team. You’ll have to contribute to your team’s efforts, ignore the useless prattle that may ensue. Take time alone to decompress from the many meetings and brainstorming.

3. Parties aren’t your thing. Alone you enter a crowded room blaring with loud music, scan the scene for a familiar face or two; and not recognizing a soul, simply leave unbeknownst to the host. Or you’ve been at a party for two hours and feel it’s time to leave, even though your classmates are just warming up. You’re tired and weary of making small talk that feels shallow to you.

Here’s a different scenario that is more palatable: some close friends ask you if you’d like to spend Friday night going to a movie or sporting event and then going back to the dorm room to engage in deep, meaningful conversation. Even though it’s 12:00 am, you’re thoroughly enjoying yourself.

Note: Your job out of college might include attending networking events, where you’ll have to engage in small talk. Always make sure you’re ready with talking points about current events, industry news, even sports.

4. You have fewer but deeper friendships. You marvel at your extraverted classmates who seem to know someone wherever they go. But when you look closer at their relationships, many of them are superficial and merely acquaintances. Your friends, on the other hand, know each others’ idiosyncrasies, secrets…in other words, know the whole self.

The drawback to having fewer but deeper friendships is that when the urge strikes you to go out for a party or a movie, your close friends may be too busy to hang out. This leaves you alone to go out for a quiet meal or a cup of coffee.

Note: You may be expected to interact with your future colleagues, lest you come across as aloof. Short conversations will be your preference with your acquaintances, so learn the art of breaking away smoothly.

5. You’re called a great listener. Your acquaintances marvel at your ability to listen to their problems and provide solutions. Justin’s girlfriend is showing signs of indifference, perhaps breaking off the relationship. You suggest not jumping to conclusions because the girlfriend is deep into her Engineering finals. You’ve become Justin’s, an extravert, new best friend, as he and his girlfriends are making amends.

Note: Similar to Justin’s story you don’t want to be cornered listening to your colleagues’ problems or simple chatter. Politely tell them you have work to do.

6. Tell her I’ll call back. It’s Mom calling, but you don’t have time to get into a long conversation about your sister’s wedding plans. You love Mom. But you hate the phone. At least if feels that way at the moment. Introverts have an aversion to the phone, because there are no boundaries when you talk with someone over the phone, not like e-mail.

Note: In the workplace customer relations often develop through telephone conversation, followed by face-to-face interactions. You’ll have to push yourself to pick up the phone at times to make or answer a call, even if it’s Mom.

7. There are times you’d rather…read. “Come on,” your dorm mate says excitedly. A bunch of your classmates are going out to do whatever. They’ve all agreed that they’ll let the wind take them where it may. It’s not like you’re not adventurous; you’ve shown the wild side of you in the past. It’s just that you’ve had a long day and would like to read a great book and maybe start another. This is your alone time and how you recharge your batteries.

Note: To fit in the organization, you may have to suck it up and go out to socialize with your colleagues, even the night before a workday. Do this sporadically to keep in good stead with your colleagues.


These are seven signs you might be an introvert. Your preference for introversion is not something to dread; rather it’s something to embrace, it’s you. I suggest you read Susan Cain’s book. It’s the best one I know of that explains the benefits of introversion in layman’s terms.

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5 very good reasons to volunteer to find employment

volunteer2Before the words leave my mouth, I can hear my workshop attendees thinking, “Why should I work for free?” I hear you. It sucks working hard and not getting paid for it; but read what I’ve got to say before you condemn volunteering to find work.

An articleVolunteering as a Pathway to Employment Report, praises the act of volunteering, claiming that one’s chance of obtaining employment is 27% higher than by not volunteering. The article points out Social and Human Capital–strengthening relationships and building skills–as two major outcomes of networking.

I elaborate on these assertions and offer three additional outcomes of volunteering: it creates a positive outlook, makes one feel productive, and closes gaps in employment on your résumé. So you naysayers, read on.

1. Volunteer to network for your next job. It opens potential doors because you’re in a place where you can do some real-time networking. Choose an organization or business in the industry in which you’d like to work. If marketing is your forté, for example, approach an organization that needs a graphic artist or publicist to design some art for their website or write a press release or two.

This organization where you’ve managed to get your foot in the door can help you with leads at other companies, especially if you do a smashing job. The president or owner will want to help you because you’ve come across as competent and likeable. Who knows, you could possibly join the company if a position opens up…or is created.

2. Develop or enhance skills that will make you more marketable. You’ve had it in your head to start blogging but haven’t had the time to dedicate to it. The company who took you on as a volunteer in their marketing department not only can help you network; it can give you the opportunity to enhance your diverse writing skills.

Your approach to management might be to offer starting a blog for them, as the rest of the marketing department is up to their elbows in alligators. They gain a talented writer to write entries, and you learn the fine art of blogging.

Volunteer3

3. Volunteering is a great way to do a positive thing. You may consider choosing an organization where your efforts are meaningful in a big way. A customer of mine said she volunteers at a soup kitchen because she has a soft spot in her heart for the less fortunate. She’s a bookkeeper, so I suggested that she also offer to do the books for her church. While she’s helping the less fortunate at the soup kitchen, she could also keep her skills sharp through volunteering at her church.

4. Feel productive. Instead of sitting at home and watching The View, you can get back into work mode. Do you remember work mode? It begins with getting up at 6:00 am, doing some exercise, leaving for a job from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, all the while feeling productive. When you get home from volunteering, you can watch those episodes of The View on DVR.

I tell my workshop attendees that one of the ways to stay sane during unemployment is by getting out of the house, and I repeat this three or four times until I know it’s embedded in their brains. As simple as it sounds, volunteering gets you out of the house.

5. Volunteering will pad your résumé. Yes, employers look at gaps in your work history. When an employer asks about your three months of unemployment, you can proudly say you’ve been volunteering at Company A in their marketing division. There you authored press releases, created their newest website designs, and started them on your way to a new blogging campaign. Of course you’ll indicate on your résumé, in parenthesis, that this experience was (Volunteer) work. Nonetheless, it was work.


Any time you feel slighted for working without pay, remember why you’re doing it; to  network, develop or enhance new skills, do something positive, feel useful, and pad your résumé. If these five reasons aren’t enough, then by all means stay home and watch The View.

7 interesting facts about LinkedIn Groups you should know

LinkedIn Groups3Which LinkedIn feature is your favorite for the job search? Is it Companies which allows you to locate and connect with people who can open doors for you? How about Jobs which, according to some, has become the second most effective job board, two notches above Monster.com. Or Who’s Viewed Your Profile, Find Alumni, Pulse?

There’s one I’ve not mentioned yet. It’s a feature that provides you with an arena to express your views, ask questions, share articles, connect or communicate with people who are outside your first degree connections, and more. Groups is high on the list of my favorite features, quite possibly my number one.

That said, I’m going to give you a rundown of Groups functions, some of which are very useful, others not very, and others a waste of time.

Your Groups’ Feed

Goups

1. Your Groups at a glance. When you first choose Groups in the Interests drop-down (silly that one of LinkedIn’s best features doesn’t have its own link), you’ll see a page that allows you to take immediate action. Rather than having to open a group, you can do the following:

Keep up with discussions. This is an easy way to see what’s going on in each of your groups (providing there are discussions happening) and contributing to said discussions. Depending on how much time you have on your hands, you can scroll and scroll down your screen to see if there is anything of interests.

start a discussion in GroupsStart a conversation (New). How easy can LinkedIn make starting a discussion in a particular group. Begin your discussion by selecting a title (LinkedIn provides some suggestions) and adding details, choosing a group (only one group. Sorry), and post it.

Manage your groups’ settings. This function allows you to rearrange your groups in the order you want them to appear. You can also adjust Member Settings, e.g., Visibility, Contact Settings, Update Settings, and Leave the Group. In terms of visibility, I tell my jobseekers to not show their Job Search groups on their profile. Rather the groups that are related to their occupation.

Open One of Your Groups and Go to Town

2. Discussions. Probably the best feature Groups has to offer, as it allows you to show your expertise through intelligent questions, thoughtful answers, relevant shares. One of my valued connections, Hank Boyer, constantly shows up on my Groups feed posting articles that are relevant to his connections.

3. Promotions. No man’s land. Promotions are ignored in most groups because any type of information posted and deemed as self-promotional end up here. One of my valued connections informed me that when he posts anything in a group I started, it is automatically placed in Promotions. I removed this page from my group.

4. Jobs. This is feature that is sometimes ignored by group members and, therefore, they don’t learn about jobs posted by their fellow members. I’ve sent messages to the members of my group informing them to look in Jobs, but this isn’t something that I can do on a constant basis.

5. Members. A valuable feature if you’re looking for someone whose occupation is closely related to yours. Type in “Project Manager” in the search field and you will be able to access the full profiles of group members who have “Project Manager” on their profile. Better yet, you can:

  1. Follow
  2. See activity
  3. Send message
  4. Connect

with any member in your group, even if he/she is a 3rd degree. I tell my workshop attendees that if they want to communicate directly with someone who’s not in their direct network, they can join a group of which the person is a member. The same goes for connecting with 2nd and 3rd degree connections.

6. Search. This is where you can search for discussions from the group’s members. When I want to search for a discussion started by one of my fellow group members, or when he’s been mentioned in a discussion; I type in his name in the field and am granted this information. There are other items you can search:

  1. Latest Activity
  2. All Discussions
  3. Manager’s Choice
  4. Discussions You’ve Started
  5. Discussions You’re Following
  6. Pending Submissions

7. Number of groups to join. I tell my LinkedIn workshop attendees that LinkedIn allows them to join up to 50 groups, but I advise them to join groups only if they will be active participants. This leads me to conclude that a good rate of participation should be at least once a week—whether you ask an illuminating question or answer one.

This further leads me to confess that I was once banished from a group because of lack of activity–yes, it’s possible. Thus, I made it my mission to participate in more groups or quit them. Should I get my hand slapped again, I will gladly apologize to the owner or manager who banishes me from that group.

My advice to you is shed the groups you’re ignoring. Treat it like spring cleaning; purge your proverbial LinkedIn house of those groups you’ve stopped visiting. Trust me, it will feel great.


If you know of other functionality of Groups not mentioned here, let us know.

As always, if this post helped you, please share it with others.

6 ways to get through unemployment

At the request of a LinkedIn connection, I read a sobering Newsweek article called Dead Suit Walking and was transported back to when I was unemployed. All the negative feelings I experienced filled my head, but I also thought about what got me through 10-months of being out of work. Here are five suggestions for those of you are unemployed.

First you need to realize that you’re not the only one who’s out of work. Currently 5.3% of U.S citizens are listed as unemployed (US Bureau of Labor Statistics ); although, the percentage is certainly higher, given that those who no longer collect UI benefits are not counted.

As I sat through career search workshops during my months of unemployment, I was relieved to realize that other talented people were also unfortunate to have been laid off. In other words, you’re not the only one.

Now that I lead workshops at the same career center, some of my customers approach me to say they appreciate my emotional support…as well as my career advice. Sometimes I wonder which is most important to them.

Realize that feelings of despondency, inadequacy, and even depression are natural. You may be experiencing feelings you’ve never had before: bouts of crying for no apparent reason, short temper with family members and friends; a diminished sex drive; lack of motivation—you may find it hard to get motivated to conduct your weekly Career Action Plan (CAP), for example. These feelings, and more, are symptoms of unemployment; you’re not going crazy.

Note: If you feel your mood taking a serious nose dive, seek therapy.

The article states about the emotional impact: “It’s devastating. The extreme reaction is suicide, but before you get there, there’s irritability and anger, fatigue, loss of energy, withdrawal, drinking, more fights with their wives.”

It’s time to be proactive, not reactive. You’ve heard of the Hidden Job Market (HJM) and may choose to ignore that only 25% of all jobs are advertised. Based on how my customers have found employment, I’m here to tell you that it certainly exists. However, you will not penetrate it without networking and becoming a student of the labor market. How will this help you with your downtrodden mood? When you are proactive and take your job search into you own hands, you’ll feel better about yourself.

Rely on family and friends to help you through the tough times. It is much better having that support to lean on than going it alone. The article looks at unemployment from a man’s point of view and discusses the feeling of inadequacy men feel when their wife has to go to (or back to) work. Both men and woman have to push aside this hang-up and believe that they’re not in this alone. If you can’t find support in your immediate family, you must find it elsewhere, perhaps with friends, extended family, networking partners, etc. Most importantly, make it clear that your job search comes first; you are still working 40 hours a week, just in a different form.

Be good to yourself. Because you’re out of work doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the basics of life, a nice home-cooked meal, a movie rental, an occasional outing, get-togethers with friends. I tell my customers that their new job is finding a job, but I warn them against burnout that can occur if they spend too much time looking for work and not enough enjoying the better parts of their life.

Lastly, exercise by walking or going to the gym, or start home projects that will further increase your sense of accomplishment. Get away from behind the computer you’re sitting at for six hours a day. Some jobseekers tell me being out of work has encouraged them to walk…for the first time. Exercise is great for the mind and your emotions.

Being unemployed is a life-altering experience. It has been compared to losing a relative, going through a divorce, suffering through a serious illness, and other calamities. But keep in mind that while these traumatic events are permanent, being unemployed is temporary. There is no easy way to get through unemployment, and those who say it has no impact on their psyche are either lying to you or themselves. In the words of one of the people interviewed for the Newsweek story, “It’s humbling.” When humility turns into despair, you must act and look forward to the small victories.

If this post helps you, please share it with others on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Reverse age discrimination could hurt your chances at an interview. 5 things to consider about the younger worker

Amy, a colleague of mine who looks no older than 30, came to me to tell me of one of her recent meetings with a jobseeker and to give me some advice. In her rapid voice, she told me that she had just met with a mature male worker who treated her as though she were a child. She was outraged and rightfully so.

Hmmm, I thought, here it comes.

Amy is well revered by the staff at our career center and the customers with whom she meets. She knows a great deal about the job search and training, so being disregarded by this man rubbed her the wrong way. We sat and talked about her meeting with him and wondered aloud if this is how he presents himself at interviews to people younger than he. And if he does, what his chances of success in this job market are. Slim to none, we concurred.

Eventually she calmed down.

Her advice to me was to bring up this attitude toward younger interviewers at my Mature Worker workshop. (She told me three times.) I totally agreed with her and immediately made a change to the presentation slide: “Treat younger interviewers like you would like to be treated.” No, better.

We career advisors always come to the defense of mature workers who experience age discrimination; but we don’t talk as much about reverse age discrimination, such as what my Amy experienced. We are reluctant to tell people who are unemployed how the interviewer might feel about their rude behavior. But this is wrong of us.

Think about if you were on the opposite side of the table interviewing people for a position, where personality fit is as important as technical abilities. How would you react if a mature worker looked at you with disdain and without saying it, called you inexperienced and beneath his level? Further, what would you think if you were going to be his immediate supervisor?

Hiring him would not be a marriage made in heaven. You, as the hiring manager, would have to prove yourself to the, albeit highly qualified, candidate on a regular basis. He would question your every decision and tell you how “he” would do things. Any effort you would make to correct his actions or even reprimand him would be met with resistance. You would feel powerless. You’d be crazy to hire him.

Amy and I believe that the large majority of mature workers have a great deal of value to offer employers. They’re knowledgeable in their work and possess life experience that younger workers do not. They want to work and are flexible with their schedule. They’re dependable, able to mentor others, and are great role models. These are but a few qualities of the mature worker.

But there are a few mature workers who think they’re all that or who have a chip on their shoulder. They are convinced that they’ll experience age discrimination at every interview. In other words, they have lost the job before the interview begins.

Susan Jepson, director of the National Senior Network, wrote an article addressing reverse age discrimination practiced by mature workers. She believes that sometimes it’s not intentional, “Without intending to, or without knowing it, mature workers can come across as arrogant, condescending; that behavior can invite rejection. Examine your beliefs and assumptions and work hard to be open and communicative with your interviewer, without prejudice of any kind.”

Susan Jepson is a mature worker, so she speaks objectively.

If you happen to be one who intentionally discriminates against younger interviewers, remember that the person sitting across from you deserves as much respect as you do. Also keep in mind that your livelihood might depend on how much they value you as a potential employee. More specifically, remember:

She earned her job. Whether she has less experience on the job than you is irrelevant. Someone in the company determined that she was the most capable to manage a group of people. And yes, they could have been wrong.

Her job is to hire the best person. You are the best person, but if you show contempt or even hint to your superiority, she won’t see your talent through the less-than-desirable attitude you demonstrate.

She will appreciate your points of view. Once assured you’re not after her job, she may see you as a mentor and role model. Younger colleagues like the approval of mature workers. Take it from someone who supervised someone 20 years my senior; her approval meant a lot to me.

She might have some growing to do. And if you want to succeed, you’ll realize that people of all ages have some growing to do, including you. You can help her through this process by building her self-esteem and confidence. It’s a wonderful thing to see someone grow under your tutelage.

Whether you like it or not, she will be your boss. What are your options right now? Enough said.

You may arrive at interviews where age discrimination is blatant due to no fault of yours. This is the time when you are the bigger man/woman and leave with your pride intact, your head held high. The word humility comes to mind, as he who is humble can adapt to more demanding situations than he who is arrogant.

In the end, my colleague Amy told her customer that his behavior was unacceptable and would do him more harm than good; and he apologized, admitting his error. We are never too old to learn valuable lessons.