The difference between the résumé’s and LinkedIn profile’s skills sections–Part 2

resume linkedin

Part one of this series addressed the differences between  LinkedIn’s and the résumé’s first impressions; the photo and Branding Statements. This post will address the differences between the résumé’s Core Competency and LinkedIn profile’s Skills and Expertise, which are distinct in their own way.

LinkedIn enthusiasts create profiles that are dynamic, while others who don’t understand the purpose of LinkedIn simply copy and paste their résumé  to their profile and call it a day; done, complete, finito.

That’s not enough if you want to attract visitors to your profile, including potential employers. If you believe you’re LinkedIn profile is your résumé, you are mistaken; there are distinct differences.

Of the résumés I critique on a daily basis, I notice that many people neglect to include a Core Competency on their résumé. This is a mistake, for this section provides an ideal place to highlight the must-have skills for a position, as well additional skills that can be a tiebreaker.  (An article from Martin Yate explains this in greater detail.)

If you’re sending your résumé to large or mid-sized companies that uses an applicant tracking system (ATS), the Core Competency section is a great place to include those keywords. Skills that are easy to scan by human eyes and keywords that will be captured by the ATS are the goals for this section of your résumé.

Here’s an example of a Core Competencies section from an operations management résumé:

Strategic Business Planning Project Management Cross-Functional Team Building IT/IS~Human Resource Issues Employee Benefits Risk Management Hiring, Training & Coaching Negotiations Research & Analysis Financial Modeling Business Modeling Portfolio Management Acquisitions & Divestitures Policies & Procedures

LinkedIn places a great emphasis on skills/areas of expertise as evidenced by its Skills and Expertise area. This relatively new section allows you to list as many as your 50 strongest skills. In addition, your first degree contacts can endorse you for any of your skills with a simple click. (The jury’s still out on the value of Endorsements).

The most obvious difference between the résumé’s Core Competencies and LinkedIn’s Skills and Expertise is the quantity you would include on your LinkedIn profile vs. your résumé. The example of the operations manager above  lists 15 core competencies, a good number for someone in that position. On the other hand, the Skills and Expertise example below lists close to 50, which would be far too many for a résumé. This is LinkedIn’s attempt at encouraging its members to tout their skills and expertise, as well as increase the keyword count.

Skills and Expertise

Another noticeable difference are the tidbits of information provided under the covers of LinkedIn’s Skills and Expertise feature. One example is the projected growth of the skills and/or expertise acknowledged by LinkedIn. There is other information you find in this feature not found on the résumé, such as people suggested to connect with, groups to join, growth of other skill and/or expertise, and more. I think you’d agree that LinkedIn’s Skills and Expertise feature is interactive, whereas the résumé’s Core Competencies section is not. This adds to Linked”s dynamism.

The next post will address the differences between the résumé’s and LinkedIn’s Summary statements.

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About Things Career Related
Bob McIntosh, CPRW, is a career trainer who leads more than 17 job search workshops at an urban career center. Jobseekers and staff look to him for advice on the job search. In addition, Bob has gained a reputation as a LinkedIn authority in the community. Bob’s greatest pleasure is helping people find rewarding careers in a competitive job market. Follow Bob on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bob_mcintosh_1 and LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/bobmcintosh1

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